best simpsons episodes you haven t seen

“Guess Who’s Coming to Criticize Dinner?”, 69. Using his Army training, Skinner tries to keep law and order, but Bart and Nelson, among others, revolt and stuff their principal into a burlap sack. “Hurricane Neddy” is a dangerously funny episode, but it’s also an intense character study. “If there had to be a bastardized version of Krusty, I’m glad it’s you,” Lisa tells her dad. His catchphrase: “Uh-oh, SpaghettiOs.” Where once Homer adored his friends mistaking fiction for fact, he now rejects it completely by changing his name to Max Power. One French tutoring session, some deception, and a disastrous prom night later (on account of the memorable know-it-all Artie Ziff, voiced by Jon Lovitz), Homer ends up uttering one of the most romantic things he’s said on the show to date — “I got a problem. Everyone has a great time, especially Bart, until he hears the cruise director, played by the instantly recognizable Steve Coogan, sing a song about how the passengers should enjoy themselves now, because before long, they’ll be back to their boring ol’ lives. On a seemingly innocuous nature walk to some local caverns, Homer stupidly touches a giant stalactite and opens a hole in the ground through which the family falls. Indeed, the complex series of events, culminating in Martin delivering a wedgie upon himself, suggest the show’s writers could have lent Jack Bauer’s crew a hand with their plotting. You’re upset. A few personal favorites: Tree house of … After all, it’s a part of us all, a part of us all, a part of us all. On its surface, “The Saga of Carl” seems like just another episode where the show goes to a foreign locale and makes fun of the place. Any appearance from the psychotic Irish leprechaun is always welcome and, sure enough, his cameo here – a fistic encounter with his equally violent Ulster counterpart that sparks a St Patrick’s Day riot – initiates a classic episode wherein Homer and Ned Flanders team up as bounty hunters while Marge works as an erotic baker. Evelyn’s also a fan of Marge’s keen fashion sense, and she invites the entire Simpsons family to the Springfield Country Club. Herschel Krustofsky) wouldn’t take it seriously. No episode of The Simpsons - or anything really - … At the least, it is funnier and more touching. Homer runs for union president and wins; the ever-overreaching Burns is vilified as the cartoon bad guy that he absolutely is, while misinterpreting Homer’s density as tactical brilliance. “Boys kiss girls.”. Lisa’s battle with the sexist Malibu Stacy doll company may be permanently stalled when her rival doll is dropped in favor of a last-minute hat upgrade, but it still results in Lisa’s strongest feminist statement on the show yet. The show wanted to create an event around its season-six cliff-hanger, and it did just that. The episode also works as a meta-commentary on Simpsons fans themselves and their reluctance to accept change. Suffice it to say that anything outside of the classic period, I probably haven't seen it. It’s midseason on TV, and there’s only one show that catches Homer’s eye: Police Cops, starring none other than … Homer Simpson. Except for that. Or so he thinks: Homer’s actually just a roadie, but once he sees his family cheering for him in the audience, he starts acting like a headliner. You'll likely remember plenty from the nineties golden era, but here's our pick of the best Simpsons episodes you may have missed since the turn of the century, now streaming on Disney Plus. This episode, in which Prohibition is reinstated in Springfield and Homer becomes a bootlegger known as the Beer Baron, pursued by an Elliot Ness-type crime fighter named Rex Banner, is one such episode. But this episode is a prime example as to why these two are just as entertaining as Homer or Bart. “Lisa’s Wedding” is packed with clever allusions to the, um, future, but it’s more concerned with how much one little girl loves her father, no matter how “trying” he is. Few Simpsons episode do a better job at capturing Lisa’s fundamental desire for connection. Coming towards the end of season three (though it was written much earlier than that — it just took an especially long time to produce), it is arguably the most absurdist episode of the show’s first era (seasons 1–4, when all the original writers were still onboard). The Simpsons’ writers came across an issue of Time that theorized what would happen if a comet were to hit Earth. We see the Lower East Side of Springfield, a young Krusty performing at a Catskills rabbi convention, and it’s all one big nod to The Jazz Singer. The A.V. It’s a rare instance of a TV-show character being proud of the extra pounds he’s put on. In “The Shinning,” the family moves into Mr. Burns’s mansion while he’s away, but Mr. Burns’s decision to keep Homer focused by cutting off the cable TV and his beer supply sends him into a Jack Torrance-style insanity spiral (enabling co-star Dan Castellanata and the animators to give a tour-de-force performance as Homer channeling Jack Nicholson in hambone mode). The miniaturization story finds Bart and Lisa accidentally creating a race of tiny creatures in a science experiment, then messing with them, inadvertently and on purpose. In “Homer’s Phobia,” the Simpsons befriend John (impeccably voiced by John Waters), the owner of a kitschy collectables store. Then 9/11 happened, and it was taken out of syndication. (“I liked this movie more than the one by that little girl because I saw it today.”). Increasingly ridiculous — from Roger Clemens thinking he’s a chicken to Ken Griffey Jr.’s gigantism to Ozzie Smith falling into space for all eternity — the misfortunes offered a specific weirdness that would come to define the show after season five. Homer’s unable to sit still while working in his living room, and during the conclusion, his daring climb up the power-plant tower to prevent a “potential Chernobyl” is paired with Mr. Burns’s surprisingly lively “push out the jive, bring in the love” exercise class. Happy streaming! Marinating in despair over her unpopularity, she resolves to reinvent herself during a family vacation to a beachside town, amping up the symbolism by bringing along an empty suitcase. For the generation of viewers who first caught The Simpsons when they were youngest, a million cultural referents were planted in their brains, just waiting to burst forth. If you buy something, we may earn an affiliate commission. (Krusty: “Ugh, 35 years in show business and already no one remembers me, just like what’s-his-name and whose-it, and you know, that guy, always wore a shirt?” Bart: “Ed Sullivan?”) And like many Simpsons episodes, this one has great fun observing the populace falling for a grandiose hard-sell, this one tinged with subliminal mind-control techniques. This flashback episode is prompted by an unclear pregnancy test Marge takes (don’t trust Barnacle Bill), which causes Homer to tell the kids the story of how he and Marge got married and how he got his job at the nuclear power-plant. “Nightmare on Evergreen Terrace” is the cruel one, effectively riffing on Wes Craven’s “you dream, you die” conceit. Then Marge gets pregnant with Maggie, and he finds himself having to balance his dreams with his responsibilities as a father. Homer gets hired at the Globex Corporation, a mysterious company headed by a secret villain named Hank Scorpio; it’s a plum job that lets Homer work for a man who seems to genuinely like him, but Marge and the kids are unhappy with their relocation to Cypress Creek and want to return to Springfield. “$pringfield (Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Legalized Gambling)” is kind of like a morality play, examining the many ways in which gambling can affect a small town. Though this episode aired first, it wasn’t the first Simpsons episode, as it aired before the first season as a Christmas special, and it wasn’t the first episode produced. “Bob Roberts” (named after the Tim Robbins movie) is packed with decades of references — including one to the Kennedy vs. Nixon debate, with Bob ably filling in for JFK — yet it’s never bogged down by dated satire. Krusty’s never funnier than when he’s wallowing in melodramatic self-pity, and “Krusty Gets Kancelled” helpfully provides him with an Olympic-size pool in which to marinate. (Ha!) “It’s as perfect an episode of television as I’ve ever seen,” Ortved says. Although Homer knows exactly what he loves — food, and lots of it — he’s unable to put his admiration into words that aren’t “SCREW FLANDERS,” so he gets Lisa to translate his drool into something more “groin-grabbingly transcendent.”. “It’s so nice to be with a person who can’t understand the horrible things I say,” remarks Moe after seeing a copy of Alice in Wonderland and presuming it’s a take on that movie he just saw, Alice in Underpants. It’s not often Bart cares about something, but when he does, he’s all in. While Marge is busy taking over as “The Listen Lady” at church, overshadowing a depressed Reverend Lovejoy, Homer, Bart, and Lisa go on a mission to find out why Homer’s head is on a Japanese box. Rapid-fire sight gags combine with effortlessly spare dialogue while Gil, as an incompetent lawyer channelling Glengarry-era Jack Lemmon, is an unalloyed delight. A man in one of the towers shouts, “Hey, when you’re done with that, I got something up here you can bite on.” Then a man in the other tower shouts at the first guy, “Hey, why don’t you be polite, you stinking puss-bag?” and proceeds to give Homer helpful information, all while maintaining that combative New York accent. After doting on a lamb at a petting zoo, Lisa decides she’s done eating meat; everyone in town, including her own family, ridicules or resists her. Log in or link your magazine subscription, 98. Though we know Moe’s life is going to reset, it’s nice to see him happy. The episode begins with a trip to a candy convention, where Homer steals a rare gummy. But the B plot, which finds Maggie getting socked away in day care and plotting a prison-movie-style escape, is just as strong, sweet, and funny. (The agent himself even makes an appearance and gets strapped to a table and menaced with a laser, à la Goldfinger, only he’s renamed “James Bont.” Occasional Simpsons guest-star Albert Brooks voices Scorpio, who, of course, sounds like an Albert Brooks character, hyperverbal and always hard-selling himself and his vision. “You? With the show’s signature mix of high concept and heart, “Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire” surprisingly feels fully formed. Homer grows sick of paying a ridiculous amount of money to see a movie only to be bombarded by 20 minutes of deceptive commercials and trailers before the film even begins, so he begins downloading them illegally online. One of the most remarkable things about The Simpsons is the number and quality of guest stars it’s been able to book over its quarter century on the air. He agrees to continue working with the mayor, but only if he’ll arrest the mobster. What happens when the kids of Springfield Elementary are trapped in the school with Principal Skinner and Groundskeeper Willie because of a devastating blizzard? That's something. This story was originally published in October 2014. 3. Things only get sillier from there. Soon after the story goes live, Homer is kidnapped and wakes up on the Island, a mysterious land where people who know too much are kept. After Bart chucks her saxophone out the window, Lisa is heartbroken. 8. “The Principal and the Pauper” is the WORST. Whereas other characters are defined by their flaws — Moe’s lack of a love life, Skinner’s crippling attachment to his mother, and Homer’s general stupidity — Flanders is always relatively free of problems. The Simpsons is an animated show, but its psychological game runs deep. Here, Abe’s disorienting rambles drive people away, but it’s an attribute that earns him the spotlight in many other memorable episodes. Krusty has subcontracted everything in this lakeside hellpit to bureaucratic underling Mr. Black, who, in turn, delegates to thuggish enforcers Jimbo, Dolph, and Kearney. There are extensive historical references as Bobo’s journey is traced from Mr. Burns throug… The Simpsons’ mythology has been rejiggered so many times that it’s hard to tell what really happened in the years leading up to Bart’s birth. And then, because he takes it to such an extreme, when he realizes the error of his ways, it is that much more compelling. Anyone who has seen Citizen Kane will pick up on the countless jokes and … It’s uncharacteristically reserved, and its final sequence — which finds Homer realizing some of his flaws as a dad and reaching out to his daughter to the extent that he can — is genuinely touching. “A Totally Fun Thing That Bart Will Never Do Again”, 94. It’s easy to forget how big of a deal the “Who Shot Mr. Burns?” series was when it aired. Like many classic early episodes, this focuses ruthlessly on its A story and keeps a tight leash on its tone, which might’ve gone from brutally farcical to brutally unpleasant in an instant had a single gag been miscalculated. A 5-year-old Bart was miserable at kindergarten, a secretly gifted Lisa had nothing to stimulate her intellect, and Marge and Homer were scraping together $200 to buy an air conditioner. When Krusty the Clown gripes that the tiredness of Itchy and Scratchy is sinking his ratings, the producers try to rejuvenate the bloody cartoon by adding a new character, Poochie, a surfing, rapping, to-the-extreme dog created via network meddling and focus-group sessions with kids who have no idea what they actually want. When Bart realizes that Whacking Day is actually a sham, he helps Lisa lure the town’s snake population into the their home by inviting Barry White, who is equally appalled by the holiday (“You people make me sick!”), to sing and use his baritone voice to create vibrations that attract the snakes. It’s a disaster. The attic tale has the creepy power of the earlier myths and novels that it draws on, while the miniaturization story is a Frankenstein variant about the moral and philosophical implications of playing God with manufactured creatures. We’re going to describe it here for those who have seen it to remember — if you haven’t, skip ahead and come back later. “Home Sweet Homediddly-Dum-Doodily” has that perfect mix of sentiment and silliness that defines so many classic episodes. Spoofing the VH1 series Behind the Music (with voice-over by that show’s regular narrator, Jim Forbes), it’s a rise-and-fall story that seems to occur not within the Simpsons universe, but adjacent to it. She’s unsuccessful, but is given the chance to show off her motherly skills when she takes Bart and Lisa to Duff Gardens. We’re in the middle of fall premiere season, when networks roll out a dozen or so new shows. This episode shows that it’s also the best TV show at figuring out how to use them. When Martin dies in class after getting frightened in a dream, the sheet is accidentally pulled off of his gurney to reveal his death rictus. There she sees her local congressman take a bribe to raze a forest in Springfield. Homer struts around Springfield for the next week, taking advantage of his unearned fame, but in the next episode, Cool Homer is turned into Bumbling Sidekick Homer. It’s a brief friendship, but any time we get to see Nelson’s sensitive side is a winning one. She can’t remember her life before it, she says, which prompts Homer and Marge to tell her the saga of how the instrument came into their lives. ... Best Simpsons episodes post-2000 (that you probably haven't seen yet) While Abe tries to be hip and young again through a small-time fast-food gig, he soon realizes that he doesn’t want to be on that side of the counter anymore. Homer has used some of them to block certain letters of the sign, which now reads, “Do It for Her.” It’s the simplest of images and it has the greatest of meanings — sometimes life involves doing things you don’t want to do for those you love. Bonus points for the baby versions of Lisa, Bart, and especially Milhouse. “Eternal Moonshine of the Simpsons Mind” won the 2008 Emmy for Outstanding Animated Program (for Programming Less Than One Hour), but it’s Outstanding Comedy Series-worthy. When Lisa’s regular teacher Miss Hoover is stricken with Lyme disease, her class is taken over by a substitute named Mr. Bergstrom (guest-star Dustin Hoffman), a gentle, funny, guitar-strumming, everybody’s-best-friend-and-mentor type. At story’s end, Kent Brockman intones portentously, “Even as I speak, the scourge of advertising could be headed towards your town!” Cut to commercial. Some fans criticize “That ’90s Episode” for ignoring the show’s past, but I’d argue there are few episodes of the show more deferential to it. That might be why it’s lighter on belly laughs than a lot of the other episodes on this list, though it has its share of sly jokes, including Lisa mournfully regarding a picture of Gore Vidal and lamenting that he’s “kissed more boys than I ever will.” “Girls, Lisa,” her mother replies. In “Rosebud,” we see Burns at his best and worst. In classic Moe fashion, the main plot of “Moe Baby Blues” starts with a suicide attempt, where, before he can jump from a bridge, he catches Maggie (who had been flying through the air after a fender-bender). Scorpio, this house is almost too good for us. But, well, “I’m Mr. But even though the rest of his family has doubts, we know Homer’s innocent — how could any man who wants to live under the sea do something so terrible? It goes from being about Homer’s slowness to a tour of the town’s adult-education classes (including Moe teaching “Funk Dancing for Self-Defense”), to Homer becoming a teacher, to Marge kicking Homer out, leaving him insane, homeless, and “as dirty as a Frenchman.” Any of these stories would’ve been enough for a normal show, but The Simpsons weaves it all together seamlessly. Second, the jokes are spot-on. Or, in the words of Lisa, “You’re experiencing spiritual emptiness because your power has isolated you from other human beings.” Homer tries to do some good in the world by opening a Stonecutters Daycare Center, among other life-affirming activities, but his brothers quickly grow tired of their leader’s newfound virtue, and everyone leaves to form the No Homers’ Club. Very few jokes hit in its unengaging tone. “Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire” is a much, much better episode of television than the next seven that aired, which were still grappling with the show’s tone and pacing. It’s Bart at his most puckish: He’s pulling a prank, but only because he doesn’t want to go back to the reality of everyday life. This episode is a testament to The Simpsons’ ability not only to build a universe filled with unique and hilarious characters, but also to give them specific internal psychologies and motivations. Some of the jokes are so knowing that they verge on Woody Allen-style cultural-insiderism; when Bart asks Lisa why she knows so much about Judaism, she replies, “I have a Jewish imaginary friend. The Simpsons’ humor operates on several comedic levels at once — situational, character-based, visual, audio, and just the individual jokes themselves — and when all of those are operating in concert, at maximum efficacy, it’s a sight to behold. Lisa and Abe will always be grouches, but there is value in being the antithesis. The best: a pitiful Burns levels with Maggie and lets her keep Bobo, although not before giving her some advice: “Don’t make the same mistake I made.” It’s a rare moment of good will for an otherwise bad man. You haven’t run out of new things to watch, we promise. One of the show’s enduring strengths is the depth and range of its characters, nowhere shown to greater effect than in this episode when Springfield rises up as one after Marge successfully campaigns to have sugar banned from the town. An atmospheric storm brings giant fast-food and other capitalist mascots to life, and they go on a destructive tear through town. “The Cartridge Family” doesn’t so much criticize owning a gun as it does condemn gun nuts; there’s a difference between the two. When Homer wins a wishbone and hopes for Flanders’s new Leftorium to go bankrupt (at least it’s better than death), we see the same troubles that normally befall Homer happen to Flanders. It all started here, with Bart needing to get a tattoo removed and draining the family’s savings, and Homer not getting his Christmas bonus and having to save the holiday. This is also the first Simpsons episode in regular run to compact its opening credits and cut straight to the couch gag (in this case, a repeat of the one from season two’s “Itchy and Scratchy and Marge,” in which the family enters the living room and finds the couch missing). Suddenly, all the nonsensical ramblings begin to make sense. I’ve created life!” Marge: “Lisa, breakfast! Their relationship nearly falls apart, though, when Homer learns that Quimby’s working with Fat Tony to sell rat “malk” to the children of Springfield Elementary. However, when Apu gets busted for selling expired meats — primarily to Homer — and is subsequently fired, he is suddenly thrust outside those confines. "You could choose every other episode from the first 200 episodes for your top 100 and you wouldn’t be too far off," one Simpsons writer told me. 2. The darker terrain inspires some outstanding storytelling while never forgetting the gags. What makes “Homer and Apu” a classic is the way in which it places a side character directly in the middle of the main quintet’s world while still using Homer as the catalyst for chaos. “Halloween of Horror” is one of those special episodes. (Note: It doesn’t include the Michael Jackson episode, “Stark Raving Dad,” which was pulled from circulation earlier this year.) In “The Haw-Hawed Couple,” which in itself is a pun on The Odd Couple, there are references to Goodfellas, Brokeback Mountain, and even an entire subplot devoted to a faux–Harry Potter book series. There is something profoundly unsettling about seeing The Simpsons’ characters outside their familiar milieu, which is one of the reasons why most episodes set in the future with grown-up versions of Bart and Lisa fall flat. (Don’t you ever forget.) This was demonstrated efficiently in “And Maggie Makes Three,” in a brief montage in which Homer rips out some of his hair upon finding out Marge was pregnant with Bart, and then more of it with Lisa, and then the last of it with Maggie. He then spends the rest of the episode trying to prevent Bart from becoming gay in the most hilariously inept ways. In order to keep his “Cal Ripken-like streak of school openage” intact, Skinner ignores the punishing weather and makes his students come in on the last day before Christmas break. And then I’ll never be able to let you go.”. Our list of 100 probably gives Marge the shortest shrift, but in this episode, we encounter her neuroses head-on. Barney, as is often the case, reveals unexpected refinement, directing a black-and-white psychodrama about his alcoholism, but Homer, who’s on the judging panel, prefers the one with the football in the groin. He’s the opposite of self-made man Frank Grimes, whom we’re introduced to as the newest employee of the plant in “Homer’s Enemy.” It’s also Grimes’s final episode. Of course, though, the reason everyone remembers this episode is because of the song. It doesn’t last long, and Homer eventually turns himself in. Leading the charge is Homer, until he learns that Apu isn’t from this country and he’s not supposed to be here. 10 Best The Simpsons Characters (Who Only Appear In One Episode) From fan favorite Hank Scorpio to Beatrice Simmons and Frank Grimes, some of these one-off The Simpsons characters are fan favorites! Director: Mike B. Anderson | Stars: Dan Castellaneta, Julie Kavner, Nancy Cartwright, Yeardley Smith Votes: 4,159 Homer grows so desperate for a single sip of Duff that he admits in an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting that he “snuck into the football stadium and ate the dirt under the bleachers.”. He is often drunk, he drives drunk, he does lots of things drunk. The Simpsons is an animated family sitcom, and the animated family is the Simpsons. There’s only one problem: Homer hates New York City. Utter chaos, that’s what. ... Here’s our guide to the top 11 cameos in Simpsons history… f you haven’t ... 15 of the best Simpsons episodes …

What Would Be A Good Cool Down For Swimming, One Piece Super Powers Lyrics, Vocational Courses In Schools, Can Two Right Angles Can Be Complement To Each Other, Industrial Organizational Consultant, Mortgage Affordability Calculator Income, Sds For Bleach Sodium Hypochlorite 4-6, Cheerful Meaning In Malayalam,